In the News

March 20, 2014 — Sean Morrison, Ph.D., Director of the Children’s Research Institute, discusses what stem cells do, how and why they change over a lifetime, and the ways those changes can be further examined in pursuit of potential treatments for certain diseases, as a guest on KERA’s radio program, Think. Listen to the interview.

March 9, 2014 — For the first time, researchers have shown that an essential biological process known as protein synthesis can be studied in adult stem cells, something scientists have long struggled to accomplish. The groundbreaking findings from the Children’s Medical Center Research Institute at UT Southwestern also demonstrate that the precise amount of protein produced by blood-forming stem cells is crucial to their function.

March 4, 2014 — Sean Morrison, Ph.D., Director of the Children’s Research Institute, recently delivered a President’s Lecture Series presentation, Understanding Cancer Through the Lens of Stem Cell Biology, on the campus of UT Southwestern. Afterward, he expanded on his remarks during a discussion on stem cells and aging. Read an excerpt of his comments.

Feb. 20, 2014 — Sean Morrison, Ph.D., Director of the Children’s Research Institute, discusses his internationally recognized research as part of the UT Southwestern President’s Lecture Series. By applying the principles of stem cell biology to understand cancer growth and progression, Dr. Morrison and the scientists in his laboratory have been able to gain important insights into the cells that are responsible for tumor growth, as well as the molecular mechanisms they use to drive growth and metastasis. Watch Dr. Morrison’s presentation.

Jan. 22, 2014 — Scientists have known for years that stem cells in male and female sexual organs are regulated differently by their respective hormones. In a surprising discovery, researchers at the Children’s Medical Center Research Institute at UT Southwestern and Baylor College of Medicine have found that stem cells in the blood-forming system — which is similar in both sexes — also are regulated differently by hormones, with estrogen proving to be an especially prolific promoter of stem cell self-renewal.

Jan. 15, 2014 — The potential for understanding how the biological setting that sustains blood-forming stem cells is involved in normal and disease physiology promises new approaches to treating blood disorders. Defining niche components and how they work together to regulate blood formation provides the opportunity to not only improve regeneration following injury or blood-forming stem cell transplantation, but also to understand how disordered niche function could contribute to disease.

Sean Morrison, Ph.D., Director of the Children’s Research Institute at UT Southwestern, has co-authored an evaluation of research on the blood-forming stem cell niche in bone marrow — the primary environment for the cells’ maintenance and self-renewal — bringing past discoveries into context and looking ahead to questions that still need to be addressed. Read the research review published in Nature.

Nov. 27, 2013 — Researchers at the Children’s Medical Center Research Institute at UT Southwestern, the University of California at San Francisco and the University of Michigan have solved a mystery that has stumped scientists for years, discovering how leukemia-causing mutations enable pre-leukemic stem cells to outperform their healthy counterparts.

Nov. 7, 2013 — Two groups of scientists at the Children’s Medical Center Research Institute at UT Southwestern have made complementary discoveries that break new ground on efforts to turn back the body’s clock on cellular activity, paving the way for a better understanding of stem cells, tissue growth and regeneration.

Sept. 19, 2013 — Previously published research has suggested that the properties of cancer stem cells can explain a variety of unsolved clinical problems. However, new experimental approaches have provided additional perspective and insight regarding the extent to which metastasis, therapy resistance and disease progression reflect the intrinsic properties of cancer stem cells as opposed to genetic evolution or other sources of variation in cancer cell properties.

Sean Morrison, Ph.D., Director of the Children’s Research Institute at UT Southwestern (CRI), and Corbin Meacham, Ph.D., an American Cancer Society Fellow at CRI, have evaluated the implications of new data for the cancer stem-cell model and the degree to which the model accounts for clinically important aspects of disease progression, like therapy resistance and metastatic dissemination. Read their research review published in Nature.

Aug. 26, 2013 — Sean Morrison, Ph.D., Director of the Children’s Research Institute at UT Southwestern, recently hosted a discussion on stem cell research at a Science Café event sponsored by the Perot Museum of Nature and Science. Read an excerpt of his remarks.